“5:37”: Translunar Travelers Lounge

Issue Three of Translunar Travelers Lounge went live on August 15. In addition to the free-to-read online format, it’s also available as an ebook from Amazon. My short story “5:37” is on the menu (one of four Jasmine Luna Blends, “subtle in scent and sweet in flavor”).

Translunar Travelers Lounge Issue 3 cover

The story’s basic concept is a decades-old joke about The Ring and technological obsolescence. Its writing was strongly influenced by my having happened to think about John Landis and gotten mad all over again about terrible labor practices and preventable accidents and how The Twilight Zone is a piece of gruesome trivia rather than (minimally) a career-ender. Some people are allowed to fail over and over again, and fail up, and escape the reasonable consequences of their actions.

That’s part of the reason I wanted to make my characters women of color, and why I wanted to give them the opportunity to escape the unreasonable consequences of others’ actions.

I also wanted to play around a bit with professional practice. Archives have historically been a site of power. The people who are documented, remembered, mourned, and memorialized tend to be the same people who are allowed to fail (overwhelmingly, though not exclusively, rich white men).

There has been professional push-back against that historical reality, including efforts to document previously undocumented voices, collect and highlight material created by or relating to marginalized groups, and assist communities and individuals who wish to maintain their own archives outside of established institutions. (The degree and success of this push-back is a whole other question; but this is a blog post about a short story, not an article about the history of the field.) I wanted to put my archivist firmly in the midst of that conversation.

And here I must apologize for some artistic decisions that may be difficult for archivists to accept. The fictional article abstract is rather over-expansive. A case study would stand as an article of its own. I should also point out that using “Tai Soo-jin (Spirit)” in the finding aid is something of an anachronism. When I entered the field, Describing Archives: A Content Standard included guidance on spirit communication along with various other name forms, but that chapter was removed from DACS in 2013. I am not sure what the current standard for spirit communication may be, but I always wanted to make use of that particular technical guideline. I hope readers are willing to suspend their disbelief.

Glitter and Hope StoryBundle

The Glitter and Hope Bundle, curated by Cat Rambo, is available from StoryBundle. It’s a pay-what-you-want/can model, starting at $5, and you’ll receive DRM-free ebooks.

Collage of the covers of the books available in the Glitter and Hope Bundle

I originally conceived of it as a hopepunk centered bundle, but as I sorted through possibilities, I found less punk than plenty of hopeful stories that reminded me that hope comes in all sorts of forms, not all of them as in your face as hopepunk…So this is a bundle centered on hope with a touch of glitter, rather than grit, and I hope you enjoy reading these stories as much as I did. It’s a range of flavors as well as forms: novels, including some beginnings; connected short stories; sequential novellas; and an anthology of stories connected by theme.

Cat Rambo

The anthology mentioned is Community of Magic Pens; I’m proud to be a part of it, and it’s one of the bonus books you unlock at $15. The rest of the bundle features titles by E.D.E. Bell, Rebecca Diem, Seb Doubinsky, Jason A. Holt, Alanna McFall, Susan Kaye Quinn, Cat Rambo, Joan Marie Verba, and M. Darusha Wehm. It’s on sale for the next two weeks.

So if you find yourself in need of a little hope nestled in your reading-device-of-choice, this may be a good use of a few bucks.

“Shared Space”: Community of Magic Pens

Today is the official publication date of Community of Magic Pens. You can find the anthology at various retailers—Amazon, Bookshop, Kobo, etc.—or buy direct from the publisher, Atthis Arts.

This project has been a delight. I was charmed when I saw the Kickstarter. A lot of the stories kicking around in my head have trended dark, lately, and this was a nice break. The editorial back-and-forth was great—I don’t think I’ve ever had a story edited so thoroughly or thoughtfully (note that I’m not just counting the short list of fiction under this byline). At some point, I told Emily that the anthology and production experience felt like the indie press equivalent of Bob Ross. Just contemplating it made me feel warm and fuzzy. (Admit it, you felt the same way when you read the name “Bob Ross.”) Some days, we all need happy little trees.

In 2020, we could use a forest.

Cover art for Community of Magic Pens

That brings me around to my story, “Shared Space.” Set in a cube farm, it’s about cubicle life. All the little ways that people negotiate fitting into corporate culture without sacrificing their individuality, all the tiny ways they find satisfaction, all the small soul-sucking realities, and the surprising ways that community can sneak up on you.

I began writing the story at the end of last year, shortly after I started a new job. (The bio in the book states that I currently work in a cubicle. That was true when the book went into production, though I was subsequently among the millions of folks laid off.) While less than fulfilling, in the manner of many jobs, I still kind of liked it. People were friendly, the cube farm wasn’t bad for a cube farm, my executive function largely executed, and there was sufficient flexibility and personal interactions that I could work there without constantly being confronted by my status as cog. As has been noted, we are steeped in capitalism no less thoroughly than the divine right of kings. Finding a not-uncomfortable niche within that system relieves some of its stresses, and writing the story was kind of a way of saying “this is fine.”

“Shared Space” has now become historical fiction. The idea of routine work in a cube farm no longer computes. Maybe in a year, after a vaccine and widespread testing and contact tracing, the old normal might be somewhat conceivable. But none of those things are in the offing in the United States, though other countries are dealing with the pandemic more successfully. Aside from the practical barrier, there is also the emotional landscape: will people accept working at close quarters after this, or be forced to do so—or will this be a catalyst for positive systemic change? Either way, there is likely to be fear, and masks, and (as always) disproportionate suffering of marginalized groups.

Some events make for a bright-line “before” and “after,” and a pandemic most surely counts as one of those events. We can’t be certain how this moment will be remembered, but we know that it will cast a shadow. Plagues can make themselves felt through silences and absences, no less than detailed data and vivid accounts.

And so at least for me, one minuscule piece of remembering this time will be to see how rapidly a story I wrote changed from a picture of banal drudgery to one of a happier past. Memory, like community, has a way of sneaking up on you.

Anthology release day

Eighteen: Stories of Mischief and Mayhem is now officially available, in trade paperback and ebook formats, from the usual bookseller suspects. (The publisher’s page has links.) The book includes my story “Like Gold Upon Her Tongue.” I spent part of the afternoon curled up reading and enjoying other people’s stories, so if you are in the mood for something dark and strange I encourage you to check it out.

Cover of XVIII

Events have been canceled, but there is also transformation. In lieu of reading at the launch party, Wendy N. Wagner uploaded a recorded reading from the bumper sticker-inspired “When Only Bears Carry Arms, Only Weapons Will Be Born.” Instead of hosting an author event, A Good Book is offering the first volume, XIII, for free to people who buy XVIII. (And yes, I am switching between Roman numerals and writing out the number. For a book filled with stories that play with reality and perception, a mercurial title seems appropriate.)

Due to the pandemic, the book launch does not look much like originally planned. Aside from the sensible cancellation of events, it feels very strange to be promoting anything right now. (This particular conundrum must be especially tough for novelists, who have far more riding on the reception of their book than any individual author in an anthology, and the publishers and booksellers with their notoriously low margins.) But people need stories—all different kinds of stories—throughout their lives, and particularly during times of stress. So please consider this promotion a bit less “ooh ooh pick me” and more “hey, this is a thing that’s out in the world, maybe you’ll like it, or know someone else who might.”

Preorder Eighteen: Stories of Mischief and Mayhem

Cover art for XVIIIEighteen: Stories of Mischief and Mayhem is available for preorder in electronic and paper formats. Visit your favored vendor of multi-genre anthologies, or check out the publisher’s page for links to retailers.

Anyone who lives in the Pacific Northwest (I do not) may also have interest in the official book release party at the Rose City Book Pub in Portland, OR at 7:30 on March 20th. There will also be an Underland presence at the Author Swizzle hosted by A Good Book in Sumner, WA, on March 21st.

Cover and TOC: Community of Magic Pens

Cover art for Community of Magic PensIt’s time for updates on Community of Magic Pens, edited by E.D.E. Bell, coming in May from Atthis Arts (and available for preorder now). The cover art was revealed, in a low-key fashion, on Twitter. It’s by Journey, a young Detroit-based artist. (She also produced artwork for the Kickstarter campaign.) It’s happy and charming and cartoonish in all the right ways.

My story about cubicle life will share a table of contents with work by Z. Ahmad, J. S. Bailey, E.D.E. Bell, Gustavo Bondoni, Kella Campbell, Minerva Cerridwen, ZZ Claybourne, M. R. DeLuca, Anthony W. Eichenlaub, Joy Givens, Beth Goder, Ethan Hedman, Andrew K Hoe, Victoria Hollis, Stella B. James, M. Kaur, Ava Kelly, Robert Kingett, Adam Kissel, N.R. Lambert, Nicole J. LeBoeuf, Gerri Leen, Lawrence Miller, Avery Montavon, Ether Nepenthes, Lena Ng, Robert Perez, Mikko Rauhala, Rai Rocca, Jennifer Lee Rossman, Lorraine Schein, Holly Schofield, Elizabeth Shaffer, Jannae’ Sifontes, K. Alysee Simon, D.A. Xiaolin Spires, Tlotlo Tsamaase, Vijay Varman, and Dawn Vogel.